Slips Trips & Falls

Vince Hundley’s Article Featured in Modern Contractor Magazine

 

Modern-Contractor-Article-1

Modern-Contractor-Article-2

Modern-Contractor-Article-3

HEAT ILLNESS STANDARD PROPOSED CHANGES

heat illnessThe Division of Occupational Safety and Health has just proposed major revisions to California’s heat illness prevention standard. The action is not formal rulemaking, but sending its proposal to the Standards Board is a big first step in revising the almost 10-year-old regulation. California has lead the nation in heat illness standards.

Employers with heat exposures may be well advised to begin adoption in advance.

Among the proposed revisions:

  • Requiring employers to provide drinking water as close as practicable but no more than 400 feet from employees, with some wiggle room.
  • Shade to be provided when temperatures hit 80 degrees (currently 85F) and no farther than 700 feet from workers.
  • Employees who need to take a “cool-down rest” cannot be ordered back to work until symptoms of heat illness have abated. Employers also would have to monitor the worker during the rest period and provide emergency services if the symptoms worsen.
  • High-heat procedures would kick in at 85 degrees, instead of the current 95F. The draft also adds specific instructions for observing employees for heat illness signs during high-heat.
  • Expanding the training topics that must be provided to employees.
  • Adding specific instructions on what must be contained in employers’ written heat illness prevention procedures.
  • Requiring supervisors to take “immediate action” if employees show signs of heat illness. Such employees would have to be offered emergency medical services before they could be sent home.

Once the Standards Board reviews the draft, it might return it to DOSH for changes or for questions. No timetable has been set for formal adoption but this appears to be on a fast track.

Cal/OSHA Construction Crackdown Happening Now

Cal osha complianceMay 27, 2014 – Cal/OSHA is deploying teams of investigators to construction sites throughout the state “to determine whether adequate measures have been taken to identify safety hazards and prevent injury,” it says. There will be focus on specific issues and employers should expect aggressive enforcement.

Cal/OSHA is reacting to a series of recent fatal falls at construction sites around California. Cal/OSHA is fanning out to inspect worksites and puts employers on notice to pay attention to fall protection.

Investigators will be specifically checking safety railings, personal fall protection devices and equipment, and tie-offs. Cal/OSHA also will be looking for trench hazards, equipment safety and proximity to power lines. Cal/OSHA reminds employers that if it finds a lack of fall protection or other serious hazards, it can issue a stop-work order at the site, which will be in force until the hazard is abated. Employers deemed to be in violation safety standards also will be cited and ordered to correct the violations.

Three workers have died in the past two weeks and another survived with injuries. They include a May 18 fatality in Riverside when a worker tied off to a train bridge being dismantled rode down when the section toppled; a May 20 incident in San Mateo where a worker fell nine feet from a wall; and a May 21 death in San Jose where a worker unloading sheetrock from the third story of a building under construction fell over a railing from a sheetrock stack.

Copyright 2014 Providence Publications, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The Workers’ Comp Executive may be forwarded, copied or distributed subject to the following conditions: (1) The full report including text, graphics and links must be copied without modification and all pages must be included; (2) All copies must contain Providence Publications copyright notice; (3) This document may not be distributed for profit.”

3 Most Effective Tools to Battle a Workers’ Comp Rate Increase

SMART Safety Group Profit and LossIn many hazardous industries, like construction, Workers’ Comp (WC) insurance is typically the third highest cost on the Profit & Loss statement.  Even though WC rate increases are beyond your control, you can battle a rate increase by doing the following:

1. Purchasing insurance from one of the most competitive carriers in your class code; and
2. Receiving the maximum scheduled credits from your carrier.

These two cost-cutting measures can be easily accomplished by doing the following 3 things:

1. Lower your EMR

SMART Safety Group ProfitExperience Modification Rate (EMR), is the number that insurance carriers use to calculate your company’s risk.  The higher your risk the higher your EMR, and correspondingly, the more you pay for your Workers’ Compensation (WC) Insurance. Having a low EMR equals profit!

The good news is that you CAN completely control and even lower your company’s EMR by:

  1. Implementing an effective safety program;
  2. Creating a 12-month strategic training calendar;
  3. Auditing on a regular basis;
  4. Managing claims proactively; and
  5. Compiling monthly reports on all your safety activities.

By improving the effectiveness of your company’s safety practices and programs you will lower your EMR and make your company more marketable to insurance carriers.

Read: How EMR Can Improve Business Performance >>

2.  Avoid Hiring Your Next Accident

SMART Safety Group AccidentIf you are suffering from a high frequency or high cost of claims then the following suggestions will help your company.

  1. Conduct a Pre-Placement Physical at an Occupational Health Clinic.  The cost of a pre-placement physical is a minor expense compared to the cost of a claim!  The physical should include an alcohol and a 5-panel drug test.
  2. Implement a thorough New Hire Orientation ensures that your employee understands your company’s rules and regulations.  You also need to get their signature of acknowledgement for your OSHA defense file.
  3. Develop a clear Claims Management Procedure that identifies who gets the first call when an accident occurs; who conducts the accident investigation; and who collects Supervisor Incident Reports, Employee Incident Reports, Witness Statements, and DWC-1 Claim forms
  4. Keep incidents First-Aid, instead of OSHA recordable, if at all possible.  A trip to the Emergency Room can kill your bottom line, not to mention, negatively impact your insurance costs for years to come.
  5. Fight fraud aggressively by staying on top of each claim.  Sometimes injured workers need to be reassured that they will be taken care of financially if their claim goes loss time.  Know what signs to look for so you can sniff out fraud right away.

Read: Claims Management 101 >>

3.  Create a Safety Culture

SMART Safety Group Safety CultureAccording to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), developing a strong safety culture has the single greatest impact on accident reduction.

For this reason all companies should focus on creating a safety culture.  In a strong safety culture, employees are empowered to identify and correct safety issues at all levels.

A “Say It When You See It” philosophy is key to creating a safety culture.  For example, an apprentice feels comfortable walking up to a foreman and reminding them to wear their safety glasses.  This behavior is not only encouraged, it’s rewarded in a strong safety culture.

How can a company instill a safety culture?  They can adopt the four “E’s” of a SMART Safety Culture, which are:

  1. Establish safety as a core value
  2. Empower everyone
  3. Elevate safety advocates and eliminate opposition
  4. Exhibit a commitment to safety in all actions.

Learn practical steps you can take in order to establish a SMART safety culture at your company.

Read: The Four E’s of a SMART Safety Culture >>

In Conclusion

SMART Assessment by SMART Safety GroupDon’t let Workers’ Comp rate increases negatively impact your bottom line and competitiveness.  Take steps today to lower your EMR, avoid hiring your next accident and take steps to create a safety culture.

SMART Assessment

If you need help, contact us for a SMART Assessment.  The SMART Assessment is designed to provide critical 3rd party feedback on your safety program.  Our recommendations are designed to help you turn your safety program into a Profit Center instead of a Liability.  Contact Us if you are interested.

3 Reasons to Outsource Your Safety Program

SMART Safety Group Outsourced SafetyFor years, companies have elected to outsource business functions that are otherwise too expensive, too complicated, or too time-consuming.  Just think of the most common business processes that companies outsource, like, manufacturing, information technology, and call centers.  It is no wonder, then, that companies choose to outsource a complex, time-consuming business process like Safety Management.

Benefits:

  1. Gain an independent third party partner
  2. Implement a proven Safety system
  3. Free up management time

Independent Third Party

check-markWhy is an independent third party crucial?  An independent third-party provides objective advice, transparency and expertise that are difficult to match internally.  Since SMART Safety Group focuses on only one thing – safety, we have our pulse on industry trends and regulations. As a result, companies are able to cut their costs while gaining invaluable expertise.

Too often, enforcement of safety policies or procedures can be uneven or unfair with an internal Safety Director – being either too soft on a work buddy, or too hard, coming across as a bully.  As an independent third-party, SMART Safety Group will never get ensnared in office politics or show favoritism.  Our feedback is always fair and unbiased.

Proven Safety System

SMART Safety Group Safety SystemSecond, SMART Safety Group has invested thousands of hours developing a SMART Safety System that is efficient, scalable and measurable.  The system is performed on a monthly basis like clockwork.  The consistent repetition of our Safety System creates a proactive safety culture, overtime, leading to less incidents and production loss.  This translates into lower operating costs, making your company more competitive.

Aggressive Claims Management

In addition to auditing, training and safety business meetings, SMART Safety Group handles Claims Management.  We have an aggressive claims management program, fighting fraud and keeping insurance rates low, allowing organizations to pass on these cost savings to their customers.  SMART Safety Group’s team is available 24/7 by phone and typically on-site within an hour of an incident occurring, to perform accident investigation, triage and damage control.

“We hired SMART Safety Group back in 2006 for a 6-month trial run.  We were having too many issues with our in-house safety program.  A year’s worth of fees were saved in the first three weeks when one of our employees was injured.  They handled the accident investigation, OSHA representation and claim, mitigating the penalties and costs down to almost nothing.  They have been a part of our company ever since.”
Brian T. Johnson, CFO/Controller,
   Minshew Brothers Steel Construction, Inc.


Insurance Procurement

Workers’ Compensation (WC) Insurance is the 3rd highest cost on many company’s P&L.  Lowering this cost, therefore, can make a huge impact on the bottom line. By linking Insurance, Safety and Claims Management, we are able to deliver bottom line results.

link
Buying WC Insurance is like buying life insurance.  The insurance carrier checks boxes for items, such as, how many times a week you exercise, your tobacco use and your general health, to determine your rates.  We help market your safety program to your WC Insurance carrier, enhancing your appeal, in order get you the lowest rate and earn you scheduled credits.

Competitive Advantage

competitive-advantageLast, in today’s competitive environment, organizations with a strong safety program and safety culture establish a competitive advantage.

Companies with a good reputation in their industry can attract the best workers, reduce operating costs, making them more competitive when looking for new or maintaining existing business. Also, by outsourcing safety, it frees up management time so they can focus on their core business.  They can focus more on production and quality, knowing that they have a world-class safety program in place.

SMART Assessment

If you need help, contact us for a SMART Assessment.  The SMART Assessment is designed to provide critical 3rd party feedback on your safety program.  Our recommendations are designed to help you turn your safety program into a Profit Center instead of a Liability.  Contact Us if you are interested.

How EMR Can Improve Business Performance

What is EMR?

emrEMR equals profit!  EMR, or Experience Modification Rate, is the number that insurance carriers use to calculate your company’s risk.  The higher your risk the higher your EMR, and correspondingly, the more you pay for your Workers’ Compensation (WC) Insurance.

In many hazardous industries, like construction, WC insurance is typically the third highest cost on the Profit & Loss statement.  So having a high EMR can severely impact profitability and competitiveness.

The EMR is based on your company’s loss history for the previous three years, not including the immediate past year, as compared to industry average.

The baseline EMR is 1.0.  The formula used to determine your EMR is complex, however, the important thing to know is that your EMR greatly affects your costs.

Compared to industry peers, if your company has fewer claims, your EMR will be lower.  If you have more claims, your EMR will be higher, as will be your WC insurance premiums.

A company with an EMR of 0.8 will pay 33% less in Workers’ Compensation premiums than a company with an EMR of 1.2. Now that’s a competitive edge!

But you don’t have to accept a high EMR!  There are ways to reduce both your EMR and WC Insurance premiums.

Who Determines EMR?

In California, the governing body for calculating the EMR is the Worker’s Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau.

The Bureau uses two major components to calculate your EMR:
1) loss severity, which measures loss amount and;
2) loss frequency, which measures how often claims take place.  Having fewer and less expensive claims is the key to reducing both your EMR and insurance premiums.

Can I Lower My EMR?

In the real world, incidents are inevitable, however, they are often preventable.  Incidents increase your EMR, leading to higher Workers’ Compensation insurance premiums.

The good news is that you CAN completely control and even lower your company’s EMR by:

  1. Implementing an effective safety program;
  2. Creating a 12-month strategic training calendar
  3. Eliminating hazards through regular audits;
  4. Managing claims proactively; and
  5. Compiling monthly reports on all your safety activities.

Companies can leverage an effective safety program to lower their EMR, reduce costs and gain a competitive advantage!

Summary

In today’s competitive marketplace, companies with a low EMR quickly establish a competitive advantage when looking for new or maintaining existing business. The EMR has a direct effect on your company’s overall operating costs, and profitability by determining how much you pay for Workers’ Compensation Insurance.

However, your company doesn’t need to be handicapped by a high EMR.  You can decrease your EMR by creating a comprehensive safety program, a strategic training calendar for your employees, auditing regularly, managing claims proactively and by compiling the necessary reports.

By improving the effectiveness of your company’s safety practices and programs you will lower your EMR.

Claims Management 101: How To Avoid Hiring Your Next Accident

Picture hiring a new employee and on the first day of work they show up drunk and become belligerent with their supervisor.

Is this realistic?  Yes it actually happens quite a bit, but it can be avoided by conducting a pre-placement physical at an Occupational Health Clinic.  The cost of a pre-placement physical is a minor expense compared to the cost of a claim!

Drug and Alcohol Test

SMART Safety Group drug screenOn an employee’s first day of work, you should send them to the clinic for an alcohol and a 5-panel drug test (marijuana, cocaine, opiates amphetamines and methamphetamines).

You should also instruct the clinic to require the employee to perform the same physical activities they will encounter on the job, including bending, stooping, pulling, climbing and lifting a specific amount of weight.  As the employee is performing the tests, the clinician will observe them for pain, unusual movements and visible scars.

Common questions a clinician should ask your new hire are:

  1. Do you have any aches and pains we should know about?
  2. Do you have any drug prescriptions?
  3. Have you been hurt at work before?

Once these items are thoroughly documented, your risk, as an employer, is greatly reduced!

New Hire Orientation

After your New Hire returns from their screening at the clinic, you need to run them through your New Hire Orientation Program.  You should perform orientations in a classroom setting, instead of a SMART Safety Group New Hire Orientationjobsite, for example, to ensure that you have your employee’s undivided attention.  A thorough New Hire Orientation ensures that your employee understands your company’s rules and regulations.  And you need to get their signature of acknowledgement for your OSHA defense file.

Claims Management Procedure

Even if you hire the best employees, some times stuff happens. How your company responds to an accident is extremely important.  But you can’t wait till an accident occurs to react.  You need a clear policy in place that identifies:

  1. Who gets the first call when an accident occurs;
  2. Who conducts the accident investigation even for the most minor of accidents; and
  3. Who collects Supervisor Incident Reports, Employee Incident Reports, Witness Statements, and DWC-1 Claim forms


First-Aid Vs. Recordable

A trip to the Emergency Room can kill your bottom line, not to mention, negatively impact your insurance costs for years to come.  Anytime an employee gets hurt you should provide the necessary First Aid Kitmedical treatment while trying to keep the incident First-Aid, instead of OSHA recordable, if at all possible.  Once an accident is recordable, your insurance carrier is notified and your Experience Modification Rate (EMR) is negatively impacted.

What is Considered First-Aid?

  1. Tetanus immunizations
  2. Cleaning wounds
  3. Bandages, Steri-Strips and non-rigid back belts
  4. Hot or cold therapy
  5. Temporary immobilization devices while transporting an accident victim
  6. Drilling of a fingernail or toenail to relieve pressure, or draining fluid from a blister
  7. Using eye patches
  8. Removing foreign bodies from the eye using only irrigation or a cotton swab
  9. Removing splinters or foreign material from areas other than the eye by irrigation, tweezers, cotton swabs or other simple means
  10. Using finger guards
  11. Using massages
  12. Drinking fluids for relief of heat stress

doc

Aggressive Claims Management

Once an accident happens, you have to aggressively manage it to minimize the long-term impact on your company.  Here’s a list of things that you can do:

  • Get to know the claims examiner
  • Get to know the Primary Treating Physician
  • Always know what the injured worker is doing.
  • Keep a record of medical treatment
  • Know when the next doctor’s visit is scheduled
  • Immediately follow up with the injured worker following the visit with the physician.
  • Offer modified work at all costs!


Fighting Fraud

fraud-fightSometimes injured workers need to be reassured that they will be taken care of financially if their claim goes loss time.  Even with reassurance, some employees may decide to file a fraudulent claim.  By staying on top of each claim, you should be able to sniff out fraud right away.  In order to fight fraud, here’s what you should look out for:

  • Someone with an unstable work history
  • Someone who is consistently uncooperative
  • Someone who was recently terminated, demoted or in line for early retirement
  • Someone who calls soon after being injured and presses for a quick settlement of the case
  • Someone who changes their address to a post office box or receives mail via a friend or relative
  • Someone not injured in the presence of witnesses
  • A history of reporting subjective injuries
  • Not promptly reporting the accident to the employer
  • Accidents occurring late Friday afternoon or shortly after the employee reports back to work on Monday morning.


Where To Start?

SMART Assessment by SMART Safety GroupIf you need help with your Claims Management program, contact us for FREE, we would love to help.  You may also consider outsourcing your program to SMART Safety Group.  The three main benefits are, you will:

  1. Gain an independent third party partner
  2. Implement a proven Claims Management Program
  3. Free up management time

The Four E’s of a SMART Safety Culture

What is the best way to reduce accidents in the workplace? According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), developing a strong safety culture has the single greatest impact on accident reduction of any process. For this reason all companies will want to focus on creating a safety culture.

What is a Safety Culture?

SMART Safety Group Safety CultureIn a strong safety culture, every employee feels responsible for safety. Employees are empowered to identify and correct safety issues as they arise.

A “say it when you see it” philosophy is key to creating a safety culture.
In a safety culture, for instance, an apprentice would feel comfortable walking up to a foreman and reminding them to wear their safety glasses.This behavior is not only encouraged, it’s rewarded in a strong safety culture. How can a company instill a safety culture? They can adopt the four “E’s” of a SMART Safety Culture, which are:
1. Establish safety as a core value,
2. Empower everyone,
3. Elevate safety advocates and eliminate opposition, and
4. Exhibit a commitment to safety in all actions.

The following are practical steps you can take in order to establish a SMART safety culture at your company.

Establish Safety as a Core Value

SMART Safety Group Core ValuesTop Management “Buy-in” is Essential – Top management needs to adopt safety as a core value to maintain equal footing with other core business interests, such as, production, quality and profitability. They can show their buy-in by repeatedly sending the right message, at all levels of the company, at every meeting. When management reviews safety performance, employees take it seriously.

Develop a Written Program and a System of Accountability so everyone understands their roles and plays by the same rules. Written programs should be realistic and usable so make the written program brief and use direct language without any fluff. The whole safety program only needs to be about 100 pages. Keep the IIPP, MSDS and all the rules and regulations in one document.

Align the Organization by having management and supervisors take a leadership position in communicating the safety and health goals and objectives with the rest of the company.

Empower Everyone

SMART Safety Group empowermentIt’s important to create a Communication Infrastructure. The success of your safety and health program is directly correlated with the frequency it is discussed at your company. So communicate safety on a regular basis – at weekly safety meetings, at monthly company meetings, at new hire orientations and after incidents occur. Supervisors need to correct, record and report improper behavior when it occurs, seeking to gain employee buy-in to change behavior. As reinforcement, they should also involve management in the follow-up to disciplinary action.

Provide Training

Provide safety and health training first to your core group of people so they get onboard with needed changes and become safety champions. Then broaden the training to the rest of the employees. Training should cover the company’s code of safe practices, policies, disciplinary action protocol and the employee’s responsibilities. Watch out for employees paying lip service to the program instead of truly embracing it. Follow-up is recommended to ensure that employee’s understand and have truly bought in to the safety and health program.

Establish a Safety Business Meeting monthly or quarterly with managers and other key people. This is an opportunity to get everyone on the same page and keep top-level management in the loop. At the safety business meeting, you should review all incidents, jobsite inspection results and disciplinary action. You should also discuss future training and policy development.

Elevate Safety Advocates and Eliminate Opposition

Define Roles & Responsibilities at all levels of the organization and develop a standard reporting procedure. Safety and health must be viewed as everyone’s responsibility.
Elevate Safety with production and quality -- SMART Safety Group
Develop Recognition and Incentive Policies rewarding employees for doing the right things and encouraging participation. And for those people that don’t support the safety culture, you should put them on notice.

Exhibit a Commitment to Safety in All Actions

Continually Measure performance, communicate results, and celebrate successes in order to sustain efforts and keep everyone motivated. Jobsite audits should be unannounced and performed frequently, SMART Safety Group handshakelike weekly or monthly. The employees being audited need to know what to expect so develop a standardized checklist.

Develop an Ongoing Measurement and Feedback System that encourages positive change instead of focusing solely on the bottom line. What gets measured… gets done. Some important things to track include accident rates, loss reserves, experience modification rate and employees completing essential paperwork.

Conclusion

As insurance costs rise (and they will rise) you can separate yourself from your competition by reducing the number of employee injuries. Companies can save between $10-20 for every dollar they spend on safety. The surest way to maximize this investment is by developing a SMART safety culture so that safety efforts remain in the organization long into the future.

How To Survive an OSHA Inspection

OSHA’s Mission: The OSH Act of 1970
oshaWith the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance. OSHA assists and encourages the States in their efforts to assure safe and healthful working conditions; by providing for research, information, education, and training in the field of occupational safety and health; and for other purposes.

What You Should Know as an Employer
Employers are expected to know which OSHA standards apply to their industry and are expected to ensure their company’s compliance with applicable standards. However, a company should also know its legal rights when OSHA comes knocking. OSHA has the authority to inspect a given location; to enter without delay; and to investigate the area in question to the satisfaction of the assigned Compliance Officer.

Preparation is Key

  • SMART Safety Group New Hire OrientationTo ensure a smooth OSHA inspection, we advise our clients to assemble a SMART OSHA Inspection Kit, which should include the following items:
    • Camera (extra film/memory cards and batteries)
    • Video camera (extra tapes and batteries)
    • Tape recorder (extra tapes and batteries)
    • Pads, pens, tape measures
    • Noise level meter
    • Air sampling kit

    This kit will allow you to document the inspection in the same manner in which the Compliance Officer does. It is recommended that you take photos from the same place as the Compliance Officer, while taking notes and documenting everything.

    What Triggers an OSHA Inspection?
    Several events may trigger an OSHA inspection. These include, but are not limited to imminent danger; catastrophes and fatal accidents; employee complaints; pre-programmed high-hazard activities; and follow-up inspections.

    Violations & Monetary Penalties
    Penalties assessed by OSHA can be very damaging to a company’s bottom line. Penalties are classified as follows: De Minimis ($0.00); Non-serious ($0 – $7,000); Serious ($0 – $7,000); Repeat ($0 – $70,000); Willful ($5,000 minimum – $70,000 maximum per day); Failure to Abate ($0 – $7,000); New Posting ($0 – $7,000).

    Criminal Penalties
    In addition to monetary penalties, under extreme circumstances criminal penalties may also be assessed. These penalties may be assessed for falsified statements, willful violations of OSHA standards, and/or employee death(s). If classified as criminal penalties, those responsible may receive imprisonment to up to one year and fines of up to $20,000. Furthermore, OSHA Compliance Officers also carry an added level of protection, because OSHA refers to the Justice Department. To this end, resisting or assaulting an OSHA representative can result in a $5,000 fine and/or up to three years in prison.

    When OSHA Comes Knocking
    It’s too late – the company is officially in reaction mode. Each company should have a plan in place prior to an OSHA visit. This plan should include assembling a management team and assigning individual responsibilities. The team should include the following individuals: team coordinator; document control individual; individuals to accompany the Compliance Officer during his/her visit; photographer; Industrial Hygienist; accident investigation team leader; labor representative; and legal counsel.

    Rights of the Employer
    Employers have several rights when an inspection occurs. As an employer, you may waive the company’s rights and voluntarily permit the OSHA inspection. Inspections are typically generated by specific complaints and there are often protected processes, equipment, and/or other items in the workplace being inspected. With this in mind, the Compliance Officer may only view the area in which a specific complaint has been filed and everything directly along the route to this location. To this end, the company should route through areas of a site or plant with a low probability of viewing any alleged violations. It is recommended that the employer follow the methodology below:

    1.  Check the Compliance Officer’s credentials

    • ID Card with photo
    • Name and employee number
    • Call OSHA to verify

    2.  Determine the reason for the inspection.

    • Targeted
    • Routine
    • Accident
    • Complaint

    3.  Take Compliance Officer to the office and keep him/her there
    4.  Notify the highest ranking site employee
    5. Notify the Company office, EHS
    6. Keep the Compliance Officer busy
    7. Only answer direct questions and don’t elaborate or go into great

    Note: The employer may opt to require the Compliance Officer to acquire an administrative search warrant before granting him/her access to the site or facility being inspected; however, it is highly advisable to consult legal counsel before exercising this right.

    OSHA Inspection Steps
    1. The Opening Conference

    • Compliance officer explains purpose of visit
    • Inspection scope
    • Standards that you should be following
    • Complaint copies given to employer
    • Employee representative part of this process

    2. Inspection Tour

    • The duration of inspection is up to the Compliance Officer.
    • He/she will talk with employees in groups or in private.
    • Observes conditions, tools, and equipment.
    • Takes photos, air samples, measurements.
    • Points out unsafe conditions:  If identified, a good practice is to correct deficiencies as you proceed with the tour; however, a citation may still be written.

    3. Closing Conference

    • Compliance Officer discusses any problems identified.
    • A question and answer session is conducted.
    • Discussion of recommended citations observed.
    • No citations will be issued at this point.

    Potential Employee Inspection Questions

    • Name – address – phone number?
    • Are you union or nonunion – What Local?
    • How long have you been at the job?
    • How long have you been union?
    • How long have you worked for this employer?
    • What type of training have you had?
    • What type of specific training for this project
    • have you had?
    • Have you had any OSHA training?
    • Are you a competent person?
    • What is a competent person?
    • Does training make you a competent person?
    • Are scaffolding classes needed?
    • At what distance on scaffolding do you need guardrails?
    • At what height do you tie-off scaffolding?
    • Do you need hard hats on scaffolding?
    • What do you know about electrical hazards?
    • Who is your electrical subcontractor’s competent person on this site?
    • What do you know about fall protection?
    • Have you been trained in fall protection?
    • Have you worked on roofs?
    • Have you ever used non-conventional fall protection?
    • What fall protection does your employer use on roofs?
    • Tell me about your employer?
    • What type of safety programs does your employer have?
    • Do you do jobsite inspections?
    • Does OSHA require you to put your inspections in writing?
    • What are your responsibilities?
    • Do you have job meetings here?
    • Is safety covered in job meetings here?
    • Do you have documentation of these meetings?
    • Do you identify serious hazards?


    Mock OSHA Visit

    If you need help, contact us for a Mock OSHA visit. The Mock visit is designed to get your company ready in case OSHA comes knocking. Contact Us if you are interested.